#contemporaryvienna

top 5 exhibitions in Vienna | November

Make sure you visit the following contemporary art exhibitions in Vienna!

Thomas Bayrle at MAK | Stubenring 5, 1010

In his solo exhibition that reflects the MAK Collection, Thomas Bayrle (born in Berlin in 1937) combines traditional craft techniques with the computer-generated art of the Information Age. Using the metaphors of dyeing, weaving, and programming, Bayrle explores the ambivalence of art, craft, and industry and gives rise to kaleidoscopic shapes—Mass Ornaments.


Traces of Time at Leopold MuseumMuseumsplatz 1, 1070
Artists: Mladen Bizumic, Cäcilia Brown, Andreas Fogarasi, Sofie Thorsen, Kay Walkowiak, Anita Witek.

The exhibition Traces of Time focuses on contemporary artistic strategies dedicated to exploring and questioning visual culture. Their emphasis is on the construction of visual aspects in art, photography and architecture, as well as in everyday objects. The research-based approach of these artists, who draw on historical documents and visual forms, revolves around the question of how historical documents show something rather than on what they show, and which functions are linked to this in the discourse of knowledge.


R. H. Quaytman, Olga Chernysheva at secessionFriedrichstraße 12, 1010

Olga Chernysheva is known as a sensitive and perceptive observer and chronicler of the daily lives, mostly of people in Russia. In drawings, paintings, photographs, and videos, she translates the impact on people of changing economic and psychological realities into “poetic circumstances.”

In the Secession’s main gallery, the American artist R. H. Quaytman has developed a frieze comprising twenty-two paintings on wood panels titled An Evening. Chapter 32. These paintings are placed on two walls that form a forty-five-degree angle. The combined measurements of the two walls equal the length of Klimt’s Beethoven Frieze, which the artist references in various ways for this chapter. Like the architectural plans for several previous exhibitions, this configuration is based on the figure of the open book and reinforces one-point perspective.


‘Occupations of uninhabited space’ at Gianni ManhattanWassergasse 14, 1030
Artists: Zsófia Keresztes, Jenine Marsh, Zoe Paul

One reoccurring trope in Feminist science fiction from the 1970s is the proposal for a functioning utopia, the very prototype of an aesthetically and libidinally orientated social vision, which is often opposed to a technological and engineering-orientated society. The authors conjure a community or society that – after the immense struggle to free itself, even in imagination, from the infection its very minds and values and habits by an omnipresent consumer capitalism – creates a narrative space radically other, uncontaminated by all those properties of the old lives and the old preoccupations; they envision a collectivity untormented by sex or history, by cultural superfluities or an object-world irrelevant to human life.

 These future(s) so imagined are never predictive; they are describing a future present. The future, in fiction, is a metaphor. Each of the positions from Occupations of Uninhabited Space imagines a life, a society, a species, a realm as radically other.


Qualia at FRANZ JOSEFS KAI 3Franz Josefs Kai, 3, 1010 |
Artists: Carl Andre, Kerstin Brätsch, Thomas Demand, Donald Judd, Craig Kaufmann, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris, Hans Schabus, Markus Schinwald, Kay Walkowiak

The exhibition „Qualia“ curated by Katarzyna Uszynska at FRANZ JOSEFS KAI 3, which features artists of two generations from a Viennese private collection, centers on different artistic strategies to investigate the phenome- non of perception. The common focus lies on the interaction between the artist’s and the viewer’s perception in relation to the object as well as on the relationship between media and reality.


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