Allgemein

“We should all start talking about artists only by their name.” Gallerist Interview with Gregor Podnar

Founded in Slovenia in 2003, Gregor Podnar Gallery soon became a popular name in Berlin, representing international and established artists from Eastern European centers. Last year, it was announced that Gregor Podnar is relocating to Vienna, where he will be also joining the viennacontemporary Admissions Committee. We are pleased to welcome Gregor back and took the occasion to ask him about his plans in his new home and place of work. 

Gallerist Gregor Podnar. Photo courtesy: Perottino-Piva / Artissima

It was announced in January 2022 that you are relocating your gallery to Vienna. Why did you decide to take this step?

The thought to move to Vienna came up around 2,5 years ago. It was time to change the city, the surrounding, and maybe to be a little bit less dependent on the international market that I have worked in all these years. In Berlin, I was very engaged in an international market and the local situation was a bit neglected. So, when, during the pandemic, we had to depend on the local scene, it became very quiet, and this is what ultimately gave me the push for my decision. I have connections and networks in Vienna that go back many years. Since my kids go to school, it came in handy to move to another German-speaking area. In addition, I have had more and more of my market and clients shifting to the Eastern and Central European areas over the last ten years. 

Do you observe an overall tendency of galleries moving to Vienna?

Oh yes, definitely. Over the last four or five years, three or more colleagues of mine moved their galleries from Berlin to Vienna. This shows how tough the situation in Berlin is. Economically, I think that I have more chances here than in Berlin. Also, there are much more collaborations with institutions here, which was stricter divided in Germany than here.

The kind of community in Vienna, the exchange and dialogue going on between curators, galleries, and institutions, is for sure something we are missing in Berlin and many other cities. Here, there is a strong feeling present of “being part of it”. 

Photo courtesy Peter Mayr / Gregor Podnar – Vienna

You started your career in Slovenia and namely Ljubljana. Do you still have ties to the art scene there?

Since I realized how close I am to Ljubljana again I started going there a lot again. The proximity gives you much more flexibility to work with clients and potential clients in Slovenia. The market is not easy there either, but I feel that there is a spirit that people want to learn more. There are some collectors who very much like to be involved, but also another clientele, who are about to become buyers, collectors, and start to follow art fairs and exhibitions. In the past, my biggest market used to be the Italian one, and I have started going back there too. 

When can we expect you to open up your gallery in the city? 

I’m currently checking out places and found one or two I like a lot. With renovations and all that I would say earliest next summer. Simultaneously I am looking for a new team, since much of my staff stayed in Berlin, which is also a challenge, after having worked with the same people for the last ten years. We will see now what was working great and what was missing – and this might help us to learn for the future. 

What are your plans here? Will you have to adapt your program to the new audience? Do you think the new city will bring new influences to the exhibition program?

Our first commitment was when we decided to start working with a young Viennese artist as a sign to start being more connected to the local scene. This, however, not only has to do with Vienna, but also with my wish to increasingly work with a younger generation of artists and integrate them into the network of artists we work with.

When I say “young”, it can also mean new – there are fantastically young artists who are 70 – so it’s not a matter of age.

We are very tight with the artists we have been working with for the last 15 to 20 years, so there will be no change. We work with many artists who have been present in the Austrian art scene and institutions, so this is for sure something worth exploring further. 

Photo courtesy C) Peter Mayr / Gregor Podnar – Vienna
Irwin, Natura Morta with NSK Flag, 1997, watercolour on paper, 40 x 30 cm

For instance, you have recently started working with Robert Gabris, a young Slovakian artist, who did a performance at last year’s viennacontemporary. What led to the decision to start collaborating?

His name popped up when I was talking to a collector about various young artists, so I researched his work online. I saw that he had a Strabag Award exhibition coming up in Vienna and I met him just before that in his studio. He is working with specific themes that are characteristic in some works related to his background and his queerness, but what to me stood out was his knowledge and his drawings – especially in connection with each other this brought me to the decision to start working with this young artist. 

What does your collaboration with the artists with whom you work look like?

 It is a relationship, you follow the artist with their way of production, questioning them, asking, advising, going and growing together, moving things forward. It’s always good to be in dialogue and see how things go.

To me, it’s a joy to be closely connected to the production process and both sides learn from that.

It is now an exciting time for me because it reminds me of when I first started with my artists about 20 years ago. Over the last years, hopping from one art fair to another, this habit of closely following the production process got for sure a bit lost. In Berlin, I had this proximity with the Berlin-based artists Anne Neukamp and Ariel Schlesinger, but most of the artists I work with live in other cities. Here, I have the chance to work with artists on the spot, which makes this relationship easier. 

Photo courtesy C) Peter Mayr / Gregor Podnar – Vienna
from left to right
Dan Perjovschi, Freedom of Speech II, 2010, Marker on painted wooden board, 190 x 191 cm
cut out from a wall installation at N.B.K. Berlin
Anne Neukamp, Untitled (INV: AN/PA102), 2021, oil, tempera, acrylic on cotton, 180 x 140 cm 

While maintaining a wide international portfolio, you always have a focus on the topic of the so-called Eastern European art. Would you say, in your life, there was always a mix between the so-called East and West? Is there, in your opinion, a way to characterize “Eastern European art”?

I come from a background in which Lubiljana and former Yugoslavia played a particular role. I was educated in Germany and moved back to Slovenia in the 1990s. I learned that this territory had a very specific artistic background, which was very much shaped by the era of the 60s and 70s. While it was a socialist country, Zagreb was the international center for avant-garde artists from Switzerland, Italy, France… So the divisions between the so-called “East” and “West” were not so present. You have those divisions when there is some kind of inequality of resources. When you say for instance “the Portuguese artist”, it labels them in a certain way. When you talk about them by their name, it signifies that he or she is already accepted in the art world.

We should all start talking about artists only by their name. As soon as we concentrate less on the definition of an artist’s regional background, we are a step forward.

The artworld is on a constant move and we should not jump on these Cold-War-divisions. In the end, we always have to look: what is the quality of the art, what is the quality of the professional work – this is the most important. 

You not only came to Vienna as a gallerist but will be joining the Admissions Committee of viennacontemporary right away. How do you feel about this role? And what are the challenges for you here? 

For me, it is kind of a comeback because I was already part of the “Members’ Board” of the then called “Viennafair” in 2004. For sure, I have some thoughts on what can be done differently, and this circles back to my earlier comments about the labeling of the so-called East and West. Over the last years, there has been an inflation of art fairs. So to best support, the exhibitors, an art fair, in my opinion, has to be as small-sized and as effective as possible.  

Photo courtesy C) Peter Mayr / Gregor Podnar – Vienna


Arrivals at Galerie Charim, Schleifmühlgasse 1a, Vienna
left to right
Julije Knifer, I(1a)83, 1983, graphite on paper, 88 x 62,5 cm
Julije Knifer, 6.XI.77 ZG, 1977, pencil on paper, 30 x 39,5 cm
Marcius Galan, Plan and elevation, 2018, iron, paint on the floor, variable dimensions
Marzena Nowak, Untitled (INV: MN/83), 2019, aquarelle pencil and water on paper, 42 x 30 cm
Marzena Nowak, Untitled (INV: MN/O51), 2020, petrified wood, salt bulbs, 30 x 29 x 25 cm
Vadim Fishkin, Windy, 2021, projection, fan, variable dimensions
Attila Csörgö, Two Oranges, 1994, C-print, 28 x 40 cm
Anne Neukamp, Untitled (INV: AN/PA100), 2020, oil, tempera, acrylic on cotton, 80 x 65 cm

In your opinion, what sets viennacontemporary apart from other fairs?

The persistent geographical focus is for sure an advantage. The art market is swayed by trends and 15 years ago it was not the only fair labeling itself according to this European scale, but viennacontemporary is the one that has endured. 

Do you collect yourself, and if so, what?

I would love to collect more! In the beginning I was much more active in buying – the art prices were much lower and that of my artists too, so I had the chance to buy more. Now, as the art market flourishes, I have to invest more and more, so I would say that nowadays, unfortunately, I collect too little. But you should never wait too long – if there is an opportunity, one should go for it!


Wir sollten anfangen, über KünstlerInnen nur mit ihrem Namen zu sprechen. Interview mit Gregor Podnar

2003 in Slowenien gegründet, hat sich die Galerie Gregor Podnar hat nach ihrem Umzug nach Berlin dort schnell einen internationalen Ruf erarbeitet und vertritt etablierte KünstlerInnen mit Fokus auf osteuropäische Regionen. Anfang des Jahres wurde bekannt, dass Gregor Podnar nach Wien übersiedelt und hier auch dem viennacontemporary Zulassungkomittee beitreten wird. Wir freuen uns, Gregor Podnar wieder bei uns in Wien begrüßen zu dürfen und haben die Gelegenheit genutzt, ihn zu seinen Plänen für seinem neuen Lebens– und Galerienstandort zu befragen.

Photo courtesy:
C) Perottino-Piva / Artissima

Sie verlegen Ihre Galerie nach Wien, was uns natürlich freut! Wie kam es zu dieser Entscheidung? 

Der Gedanke, nach Wien zu ziehen, kam vor etwa 2,5 Jahren zum ersten Mal auf. Es war an der Zeit, die Stadt und die Umgebung zu wechseln und vielleicht ein bisschen weniger abhängig vom internationalen Markt zu sein, auf dem ich all die Jahre gearbeitet habe. In Berlin war ich sehr stark in einem internationalen Markt engagiert und die lokale Situation wurde etwas vernachlässigt. Als Berlin dann während der Pandemie auf die lokale Szene angewiesen war, wurde es plötzlich sehr ruhig, und das gab mir letztendlich den Anstoß für meine Entscheidung. In Wien habe ich Verbindungen und Netzwerke, die viele Jahre zurückreichen. Da meine Kinder zur Schule gehen, kam es mir gelegen, in ein deutschsprachiges Land zu ziehen. Außerdem haben sich mein Markt und meine KundInnen in den letzten zehn Jahren mehr und mehr in den ost- und mitteleuropäischen Raum verlagert. 

Beobachten Sie die allgemeine Tendenz bei Galerien, nach Wien zu ziehen?

Oh ja, definitiv. In den letzten vier oder fünf Jahren haben drei oder mehr meiner KollegInnen ihre Galerien von Berlin nach Wien verlegt. Das zeigt, wie schwierig die Situation in Berlin ist. Wirtschaftlich denke ich, dass ich hier mehr Chancen habe. Außerdem gibt es hier viel mehr Kooperationen mit Institutionen, das wird in Deutschland doch strenger getrennt.

Die Art von Gemeinschaft in Wien, der Austausch und der Dialog zwischen KuratorInnen, Galerien und Institutionen ist sicherlich etwas, das wir in Berlin und vielen anderen Städten vermissen. Hier gibt es ein starkes Gefühl, “dazuzugehören”. 

Photo courtesy C) Peter Mayr / Gregor Podnar – Vienna

Sie haben Ihre Karriere in Slowenien, genauer gesagt in Ljubljana, begonnen. Haben Sie noch Verbindungen zur dortigen Kunstszene?

Seit ich gemerkt habe, wie nah ich nun an Ljubljana bin, fahre ich wieder öfter dorthin. Die Nähe gibt einem viel mehr Flexibilität bei der Arbeit mit KundInnen sowie potenziellen KundInnen in Slowenien. Der Markt ist auch dort nicht einfach, aber ich habe das Gefühl, dass ein gewisser Mindset herrscht, dass die Leute mehr lernen wollen. Es gibt einige SammlerInnen, die sich sehr gerne engagieren, aber auch eine andere Klientel, die sich zu KäuferInnen und SammlerInnen entwickelt, und die beginnt, Kunstmessen und Ausstellungen zu verfolgen. In der Vergangenheit war mein größter Markt der italienische, und ich habe seit meinem Umzug begonnen, auch öfter dorthin zurückzukehren. 

Wann können wir damit rechnen, dass Sie Ihre Galerie in der Stadt eröffnen? 

Ich schaue mir derzeit einige Orte an und habe ein oder zwei gefunden, die mir sehr gut gefallen. Mit Renovierungen und all dem würde ich sagen, frühestens im nächsten Sommer. Gleichzeitig bin ich auf der Suche nach einem neuen Team, da ein Großteil meiner MitarbeiterInnen in Berlin geblieben ist, was auch eine Herausforderung ist, nachdem ich die letzten zehn Jahre mit denselben Leuten gearbeitet habe. Wir werden jetzt sehen, was gut funktioniert hat und was gefehlt hat – und auch das könnte uns helfen, für die Zukunft zu lernen. 

Welche Pläne haben Sie für Wien? Werden Sie Ihr Programm an das neue Publikum anpassen müssen? Und glauben Sie, dass die Stadt auch neue Einflüsse auf Ihr Ausstellungsprogramm ausüben wird?

Unser erstes Engagement war die Entscheidung, mit einem jungen Wiener Künstler zusammenzuarbeiten, als Zeichen dafür, dass wir uns stärker mit der lokalen Szene verbinden wollen. Das hat aber nicht nur mit Wien zu tun, sondern auch mit meinem Wunsch, verstärkt mit einer jüngeren Generation von KünstlerInnen zu arbeiten und sie in unser bestehendes KünstlerInnennetzwerk zu integrieren.

Wenn ich “jung” sage, kann das auch “neu” bedeuten – es gibt fantastisch junge KünstlerInnen, die 70 sind – das ist also keine Frage des Alters.

Mit den KünstlerInnen, mit denen wir in den letzten 15 bis 20 Jahren zusammengearbeitet haben, sind wir sehr eng verbunden, es wird sich also nichts ändern. Wir arbeiten mit vielen Künstlerinnen und Künstlern, die in der österreichischen Kunstszene und in den Institutionen präsent sind, und das ist sicher etwas, das man weiterverfolgen sollte. 

Photo courtesy C) Peter Mayr / Gregor Podnar – Vienna
Irwin, Natura Morta with NSK Flag, 1997, watercolour on paper, 40 x 30 cm

Sie arbeiten seit kurzem auch mit Robert Gabris zusammen, einem jungen slowakischen Künstler, der letztes Jahr eine Performance bei viennacontemporary gemacht hat. Wie kam es zu der Entscheidung?

Sein Name tauchte auf, als ich mich mit einem Sammler über verschiedene junge KünstlerInnen unterhielt, also habe ich seine Arbeit im Internet recherchiert. Ich sah, dass er demnächst eine Strabag Award Ausstellung in Wien hat und traf ihn kurz davor in seinem Atelier. Er arbeitet mit bestimmten Themen, die in einigen Werken charakteristisch sind und mit seiner Herkunft und seinem Queer-Sein zu tun haben, aber was für mich herausstach, waren sein unglaubliches Wissen und seine Zeichnungen – vor allem in Verbindung miteinander, was mich zu der Entscheidung brachte, mit diesem jungen Künstler zu arbeiten. 

Wie sieht so eine Zusammenarbeit bei Ihnen aus?

Es ist eine Beziehung, man folgt der Künstlerin oder dem Künstler bei seiner Produktionsweise, hinterfragt, fragt, berät, geht und wächst gemeinsam, bringt Dinge voran. Es ist immer gut, im Dialog zu stehen und zu sehen, wie sich die Dinge entwickeln. Für mich ist es eine Freude, eng mit dem Produktionsprozess verbunden zu sein, und beide Seiten lernen davon.

Es ist jetzt eine aufregende Zeit für mich, denn sie erinnert mich an die Zeit, als ich vor etwa 20 Jahren mit meinen KünstlerInnen anfing.

In den letzten Jahren, in denen ich von einer Kunstmesse zur nächsten gehüpft bin, ist diese Gewohnheit, den Produktionsprozess genau zu verfolgen, sicherlich ein wenig verloren gegangen. In Berlin hatte ich diese Nähe zu den in Berlin lebenden KünstlerInnen Anne Neukamp und Ariel Schlesinger, aber die meisten KünstlerInnen, mit denen ich arbeite, leben in anderen Städten. Hier habe ich die Möglichkeit, mit den KünstlerInnen vor Ort zu arbeiten, was diese Beziehung einfacher macht. 

Photo courtesy C) Peter Mayr / Gregor Podnar – Vienna
from left to right
Dan Perjovschi, Freedom of Speech II, 2010, Marker on painted wooden board, 190 x 191 cm
cut out from a wall installation at N.B.K. Berlin
Anne Neukamp, Untitled (INV: AN/PA102), 2021, oil, tempera, acrylic on cotton, 180 x 140 cm 

Obwohl Sie ein breites internationales Portfolio haben, liegt Ihr Schwerpunkt immer auf dem Thema der so genannten osteuropäischen Kunst. Welche Rolle hat der so genannte Osten und dem Westen in Ihrem Leben gespielt?

Ich komme aus einem Umfeld, in dem Lubiljana und das ehemalige Jugoslawien eine besondere Rolle gespielt haben. Ich bin in Deutschland ausgebildet worden und in den 1990er Jahren zurück nach Slowenien gezogen. Ich lernte, dass dieses Gebiet einen sehr spezifischen künstlerischen Hintergrund hat, der stark von der Zeit der 60er und 70er Jahre geprägt ist. Obwohl es ein sozialistisches Land war, war Zagreb gleichzeitig ein internationales Zentrum für Avantgarde-KünstlerInnen aus der Schweiz, Italien, Frankreich… Die Trennung zwischen dem so genannten “Osten” und “Westen” war also nicht so präsent. Solche Trennungen gibt es vor allem, wenn es eine Art Ungleichheit der Ressourcen gibt. Wenn man zum Beispiel “der portugiesische Künstler” sagt, werden sie auf eine bestimmte Weise bereits in Schubladen gesteckt. Wenn man sie nur mit Namen anführt, bedeutet das, dass sie oder er in der Kunstwelt bereits akzeptiert ist.

Wir sollten alle anfangen, über KünstlerInnen nur mit ihrem Namen zu sprechen. Sobald wir uns weniger auf die Definition der regionalen Herkunft von KünstlerInnen konzentrieren, sind wir schon einen Schritt weiter.

Die Kunstwelt ist in ständiger Bewegung und wir sollten nicht auf diese Kalter-Krieg-Einteilungen aufspringen. Letztlich müssen wir immer schauen: Was ist die Qualität der Kunst, was ist die Qualität der professionellen Arbeit – das ist das Wichtigste. 

Sie sind nicht nur als Galerist nach Wien gekommen, sondern treten auch dem Zulassungskomittee von viennacontemporary bei. Wie fühlen Sie sich in dieser Rolle? Und was sind die Herausforderungen für Sie dabei? 

Für mich ist es eine Art Comeback, denn ich war bereits 2004 Teil des “Members’ Board” der damaligen “Viennafair”. Sicherlich habe ich einige Gedanken darüber, was anders gemacht werden kann, und das kreist zurück zu meinen früheren Bemerkungen über die Etikettierung des sogenannten Ostens und Westens. In den letzten Jahren hat es eine Inflation von Kunstmessen gegeben. Um die AusstellerInnen bestmöglich zu unterstützen, muss eine Kunstmesse meiner Meinung nach so klein und so effektiv wie möglich sein.

Photo courtesy C) Peter Mayr / Gregor Podnar – Vienna


Arrivals at Galerie Charim, Schleifmühlgasse 1a, Vienna
left to right
Julije Knifer, I(1a)83, 1983, graphite on paper, 88 x 62,5 cm
Julije Knifer, 6.XI.77 ZG, 1977, pencil on paper, 30 x 39,5 cm
Marcius Galan, Plan and elevation, 2018, iron, paint on the floor, variable dimensions
Marzena Nowak, Untitled (INV: MN/83), 2019, aquarelle pencil and water on paper, 42 x 30 cm
Marzena Nowak, Untitled (INV: MN/O51), 2020, petrified wood, salt bulbs, 30 x 29 x 25 cm
Vadim Fishkin, Windy, 2021, projection, fan, variable dimensions
Attila Csörgö, Two Oranges, 1994, C-print, 28 x 40 cm
Anne Neukamp, Untitled (INV: AN/PA100), 2020, oil, tempera, acrylic on cotton, 80 x 65 cm

Wodurch unterscheidet sich viennacontemporary Ihrer Meinung nach von anderen Messen?

Die konsequente geografische Ausrichtung ist sicher ein Vorteil. Der Kunstmarkt ist von Trends geprägt und vor 15 Jahren war viennacontemporary nicht die einzige Messe, die sich nach diesem europäischen Maßstab ausgerichtet hat, aber sie ist die einzige, die sich gehalten hat. 

Sammeln Sie selbst, und wenn ja, was?

Ich würde gerne mehr sammeln! Am Anfang war ich viel aktiver beim Kaufen – die Kunstpreise waren niedriger – auch die meiner KünstlerInnen – also hatte ich die Möglichkeit, mehr zu kaufen. Jetzt, da der Kunstmarkt derart floriert, muss ich mehr und mehr investieren, daher würde ich sagen, dass ich heute leider zu wenig sammle. Aber man sollte nie zu lange warten – wenn sich eine Gelegenheit bietet, sollte man sie ergreifen!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s